Photo of Matthew Hawkins

Matthew Hawkins

Instructor I

Degrees:PhD (Carleton University)
Phone:613-520-2600 x 2795
Email:matthew.hawkins@carleton.ca
Office:A711 Loeb Building

Areas of Interest

Matthew is a passionate soccer fan and he explores concepts of solidarity, belonging, emotion, and the uses of memory through the fandom of soccer crowds. His fieldwork in Buenos Aires, Argentina focuses on the efforts of fans of Club Atletico San Lorenzo de Almagro to regain ownership of a stadium property lost during Argentina’s civic-military dictatorship (1976-1983). San Lorenzo, under-pressure from the government of the City of Buenos Aires, sold their stadium property in the neighbourhood of Boedo in 1982. From a feeling of spatial and historical disconnection, fans of San Lorenzo began organizing in 2005 to regain the property and return the soccer club to Boedo. Fans created a grassroots social movement, which culminated in demonstrations of up to 100 000 people in front of City of Buenos Aires Legislature and an agreement to return the property to the club. Entangled in the politics of memory and the human rights violations of the dictatorship, soccer’s significance to urban space, and the weekly performances of crowd fandom, San Lorenzo’s story demonstrates the unexpected ways in which people create moments of political change. Matthew has been encouraged by soccer fans to think about social movements and collective politics otherwise and to give attention to how emotional bonds are reproduced and sustain collective identities.

His research formed the basis of a short documentary, “The 40 Year Fight Against Football Exile,” made by Copa 90.

Teaching Interests

Matthew teaches an introduction course to socio-cultural anthropology, as well as the Capstone to the Globalization, Culture and Power stream in the Bachelor of Global and International Studies program. He also teaches a course on ritual, which explores how people enact and sustain their social connections in different contexts. The courses Matthew teaches include an emphasis on ethnographic research from Latin America, with a focus on themes in urban anthropology and sport.