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Faculty and Staff / Rishad Irani

Rishad Irani

Assistant Professor

    Email:rishad.irani@carleton.ca
    Phone:613-520-2600, ext. 5057
    Degrees:BASc (Windsor), MASc (Dalhousie), PhD (Dalhousie)

    Biography

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Rishad Irani joined Carleton University in January 2016. Previously, he was a Senior Mechanical Engineer with Rolls-Royce Canada Limited (Naval Marine). He completed PhD and MASc in Mechanical Engineering at Dalhousie University and his BASc in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Windsor. He is multidisciplinary system modeller who has been published in the Journal of Terramechanics, Aerosol Science and Technology and the Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture. In the past he has worked with WHOI, MDA Space Mission, DaimlerChrysler and Siemens Automotive. His current research focuses on multi-domain modelling and mechatronic applications for advanced and automated launch and recovery system in the marine environment.

    RESEARCH PROGRAM:

    The mission of my overall research program is to increase safety on maritime vessels by advancing deck-machinery and robotics. To increase operational availability and welfare during maritime load transfers, the research program focuses on enabling technologies and modelling techniques that are required to compensate for the relative motion on all axes and during all phases of lifting operations. The overall research program takes a systems level approach to the problem to make advances in: control algorithms, system modelling, robotic actuation, design and implementation of marine deck machinery.

     INTERESTS:

    • Multi Domain System Modelling
    • Ocean Technologies (Launch and Recovery Systems)
    • Mechatronics
    • Control system applications
    • Marine Motion Compensation Systems
    • Cable Modelling
    • Anti-Pendulum Crane Systems

    POSITIONS AVALIBLE:

    I am currently searching to fill a PhD position whose work would focus on determining the optimal time and mothership conditions to recover a tethered underwater sensor or vehicle or developing new maritime anti-pendulum systems. Additionally, I am also looking for a graduate student to assist with a non-linear multi-body dynamic analysis of an aircraft landing gear system.

    Domestic students with a solid academic standing in their last two years are encouraged to apply. A background of system modelling, dynamics and control is required for most of my research projects.

    Exposure and interest in marine system is always a benefit.

    International students with strong background of system modelling, dynamics and control a high academic standing and TOEFL/IELTS score are encouraged to apply. Exposure and interest in marine system is always a benefit.

    NSERC and OGS candidates/scholars are always welcome and top-up funding is available.

    Many project involve industrial partners, therefore, students could have the opportunity to work closely with our industrial collaborators.

    NEW POSITIONS: (2017-11)

    We are currently beginning a new research project that focuses on the application of robots in machining aerospace components with sensory feedback to achieve high precision and process stability.

    This multidisciplinary project had excellent potential for prospective graduate candidates, through exposure to in-depth fundamental research, design, control, manufacturing, software, and sensing, as well as practical aspects of aerospace and manufacturing industry. The candidates will visit and work with our industrial partner’s state-of-the-art facilities, and learn about other modern machines and processes.

    We are currently searching for:

    • One postdoctoral fellow
    • One doctoral student
    • One Master’s students

    The postdoctoral research fellow should have advanced training and expertise in robotic manipulators and be well published in robotics and controls. Expertise in robotic force control algorithms and implementation, sensor-based control, sensor data processing, real-time control, and machining processes  are  highly desired.

    The PhD student will focus on the robot path planning, robot control, dynamic modelling, vibrational analysis, force feedback, and experiment design and analysis for a prototype robotic machining system. A MASc with appropriate course work, related research work or publications, and knowledge of to two or more of the motioned topics is highly desirable

    The MASc student will design the initial mechanical end effector of the robotic system; perform vibrational analysis, and studying the actual manufacturing process through experiments. Candidates should have a strong mechanical design background and experience.

    Interested applicants should send a statement of interest and their CV to Drs. Irani (Rishad.Irani@Carleton.ca).

    SELECT PUBLICATIONS:

    Irani R. A., Schut N., Hayes M.J., and Langlois R., (2017) A Novel Flight Simulator Capable of Unbounded Rotation. In the proceedings of 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Systems Engineering, Vienna, Austria, October 11-13th, 2017.

    Westin C., Irani R. A. (2017) Cable-Pulley Interaction with Dynamic Wrap Angle Using the Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation. In the proceedings of the 4th International Conference of Control, Dynamic Systems, And Robotics (CDSR’17), Toronto, Canada, August 21-23rd, 2017. (Best Paper Award)

    Woodacre J., Woles W., Bauer R. J., Irani R. A. (2016) Coupling a Standard Hydraulic Valve and Advanced Control to Achieve a Motion Compensation System. In the proceedings of American Society of Naval Engineers: Launch & Recovery Symposium, Linthicum, Maryland, November 16-17th, 2016.

    Calnan C., Bauer R., Irani R. A., (2016) Controller Design and Generalized Motion Compensation for Marine Towed Bodies. Oceans16 MTS IEEE Monterey, September 19-23rd 2016.

    Woodacre J., Bauer R. J., Irani R. A. (2015) A Review of Vertical Motion Heave Compensation Systems. Ocean Engineering. v. 104, pp 140-154.

    Irani R. A., Bauer R. J., North L., Nicholson M., Nolan D., West B. (2015) Analysis of Joint Failures on the Lateral Undulation Gait of a Robotic Snake. Transactions of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering. v. 39, n. 2, pp 253-268.

    Irani R. A., Spencer W. W. (2014) Future Launch and Recovery System. In the proceedings of American Society of Naval Engineers: Launch & Recovery of Manned and Unmanned Vehicles from Surface Platforms, Linthicum, Maryland, November 19-20, 2014.

    Irani R. A., Kehoe D., Spencer W. W., Watt G., Gillis C., Carretero J. A., Dubay R. (2014) Towards a UUV Launch and Recovery System on a Slowly Moving Submarine. In the proceedings of The Royal Institution of Naval Architects: Warship 2014, Naval Submarines & UUV’s, Bath, UK, June 18-19 2014.

    Irani R. A., Bauer R. J., Warkentin A. (2014) Application of a Dynamic Pressure-Sinkage Relationship for Lightweight Mobile Robots. International Journal of Vehicle Autonomous Systems. v.12 n. 1 pp 1-23.

    Irani R. A., Bauer R. J., Warkentin A. (2013) Dynamic Wheel-Soil Model for Lightweight Mobile Robots. Journal of Intelligent and Robotic Systems. v. 71, n. 2, pp 179-193.

    Irani R. A., Bauer R. J., Warkentin A. (2011) A Dynamic Terramechanic Model for Small Lightweight Vehicles with Rigid Wheels and Grousers Operating in Sandy Soil. Journal of Terramechanics. v. 48, n. 4, pp 307-318