Photo of Melissa Redmond

Melissa Redmond

Assistant Professor, Co-Chair Centre for Studies on Poverty and Social Citizenship

Degrees:Ph.D. (University of Toronto)
Phone:613-520-2600 x 2998
Email:melissa.redmond@carleton.ca
Office:612 Dunton Tower

Dr. Melissa Redmond is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Carleton University. With Dr. Ilyan Ferrer, she also co-chairs the Centre for Studies on Poverty and Social Citizenship. Dr. Redmond’s current research examines the societal and social work possibilities associated with local public libraries (SSHRC-funded co-investigation with Dr. Beth Martin). Dr. Redmond maintains an active research agenda in addition to her teaching, administrative and service duties at Carleton University and within the wider community.
Eligible to supervise undergraduate and graduate students.

Currently accepting volunteer inquiries.

Courses:

  •  SOWK 2005: Values and Ethics for Social Work
  •  SOWK 3100: Social Policy and Administration
  •  SOWK 3207: Human Rights in Civil Society
  •  SOWK 5003: Policy Context of Social Work
  •  SOWK 6102: Ethical Foundations

Scholarly Work & Research Interests:

Dr. Redmond’s research interests include social service program access, children’s human rights, wellness and health promotion, poverty reduction strategies, cultural identity and gender concerns and social work pedagogy. Dr. Redmond has worked as a social work practitioner, researcher and community advocate in varied academic and organizational settings.

Raised in Montreal, Dr. Redmond has worked as a professional social worker and researcher in both French and English. Melissa Redmond holds a B.A. degree in Psychology & Western Civilization and Culture from Concordia University; a B.S.W. from the School of Social Work at McGill University; and Bachelor of Civil Law, Bachelor of Laws and Masters of Social Work degrees from the Faculty of Law and School of Social Work at McGill and a PhD from the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto.

Selected Publications:

Fuller-Thomson, E., Jayanthikumar, J., Redmond, M. L., & Agbeyaka, S. (2020). Is recovery from cannabis dependence possible? Factors that help or hinder recovery in a national sample of Canadians with a history of cannabis dependence. Advances in Preventive Medicine, 2020.

Martin, B., Redmond, M., & Woodside, L. (2022). Electoral Candidate Debates for Policy Learning in Large First-Year Classes. Journal of Political Science Education, 1-17.

Redmond, M., & Martin, B. (2023). All in the (definition of) family: Transnational parent–child relationships, rights to family life, and Canadian immigration law. Journal of Family Issues, 44(3), 766-784.

Redmond, M. L., Buhrmann, A. S., & Fuller-Thomson, E. (2021). The Continuum of Recovery from Alcohol Dependence: From Addiction Remission to Complete Mental Health. Substance Use & Misuse, 56(9), 1320-1331.