Adjunct research professors refer to retired associate or assistant professors or professors external to the University who demonstrate significant scholarship and activity in research as well as continuing involvement in significant research activities at the University.

Note: Graduate students whose theses are supervised by Adjunct Research Professors must have a co-supervisor who is a Carleton Psychology faculty member with graduate supervision status.

Kelley Blanchette

Ph.D. (Carleton)
Gender and crime, women offenders, and offender assessment.

Pierre Blier

M.D. (Montréal), Ph.D. (Montréal)
Director and Endowed Chair, Mood Disorders Research, University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research

Amanda Bullock

Ph.D. (Carleton)

Guy Bourgon

Ph.D., C. Psych. (Ottawa)
Public Safety Canada

Community corrections, treatment, risk assessment, responsivity, and implementation of evidence-based practices.

Annick Buchholz

Ph.D. C. Psych, (Concordia)
Dr. Buchholz is a clinical psychologist, and lead in outcomes management and research at the Centre for Healthy Active Living (CHAL). Dr. Buchholz has also been involved in the development and evaluation of the prevention program ‘BodySense,’ a program aimed at promoting healthy body image in athletes.

She is a co-investigator on ‘Research on Eating and Adolescent Lifestyles,’ an Ottawa-based longitudinal study examining shared risk factors between eating disorders and obesity in youth. Her research interests include psychosocial risk factors related to disordered eating and weight regulation in children and youth.

Julie Caouette

Ph.D. (McGill)
Dr. Caouette focuses on the social psychology of intergroup relations, especially the attitudes of mainstream society towards minority groups, such as Aboriginal peoples. Beyond the general role of prejudice, I am interested in the specific role of social emotions, such as collective guilt, in understanding the nature of conflict between such groups.

Barbara Collins

Ph.D. (Ottawa)
Cognitive effects of cancer and cancer therapy; cognitive ramifications of heart disease, cardiac arrest.

Kimberly Corace

Ph.D. (York)
Current positions:  Clinical Health Psychologist, Department of Psychology and Division of Infectious Diseases at The Ottawa Hospital. Project Director, Regional Opioid Intervention Service at The Royal. Clinical Investigator at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research.

Research areas: Dr. Corace conducts research in mental health, addictions, stigma, hepatitis C, and health care worker influenza vaccination uptake. She has expertise in health behaviour change, treatment readiness and adherence, and program evaluation. Her work focuses on improving treatment access, uptake, and outcomes for marginalized populations with mental health and substance use co-morbidities and developing collaborative hospital-community models of care.

Julie Dempsey

Neda Faregh

Ph.D. (Carleton)
Postdoctoral (McGill) McGill University Health Centre Addiction, Gambling Pathology; Effects of Addiction on the Family.
Transcultural psychology, e-health, addictions and gambling pathology, and psychological aspects of pain.

Gary Goldfield

Ph.D. (Carleton)
Environmental and genetic risk factors, prevention and treatment of obesity and eating disorders in children, adolescents and adults.

Brian Grant

Ph.D. (Queen’s)
Corrections and criminal justice research with special interests in addictions, assessment, treatment programs and release options.

R. Karl Hanson

Ph.D. (Waterloo)
Public Safety Canada

Sexual offenders and abusive men. Meta-analysis.

Joanne L. Harbluk

Ph.D. (Western)
Dr Joanne Harbluk is a Human Factors Specialist in the Ergonomics & Crash Avoidance Division of Transport Canada.  She is active in research investigating the interaction of the driver, vehicle & road systems. Current work is focused on the safety of in-vehicle information and communication systems and the efficacy of crash avoidance and mitigation systems for drivers.

Cheryl Harris

Ph.D. (Ottawa)
Clinical Health Psychologist

Psychotherapy research in oncology; adverse effects of cancer treatment (e.g., chronic pain, insomnia); survivorship issues; psychometrics.

Leslie-Maaike Helmus

Katherine Henderson

Ph.D. (York)
Clinical Psychologist in CHEO Eating Disorder Program

Research on outcomes management, etiology, treatment, and prevention of eating disorders in children and youth.  Body image, self-esteem, family and peer functioning, coping, and emotional functioning.  Community and clinical based research.

Patrick Hill

Ph.D (University of Notre Dame, IN)

My research strives toward addressing three questions important to understanding how to promote health and well-being across the lifespan. First, what is the role of personality and individual differences in predicting health outcomes? Toward this end, my work has focused on identifying the pathways by which personality traits predict health. In turn, my research also examines the mechanisms that underlie personality development, in order to help us understand what leads to adaptive personality changes.

Second, what are the benefits associated with presumptively moral or prosocial personality characteristics? For instance, my work has demonstrated that individuals who place greater emphasis on life goals focused on benefiting others tend to report greater personal well-being. In addition, my studies suggest that being dispositionally forgiving or grateful may lead to greater psychological, emotional, and physical health.

Third, my research investigates a number of important questions related to whether and how adolescents find a purpose or direction for their lives. For instance, what does having a purpose mean to youth, and what kinds of purposes do youth nominate? In addition, my work has shown that purposeful adolescents tend to fare better across a wide array of psychological and development outcomes.

Dr. Natalia Jaworska

Dr. Natalie Jones

P.J. Kleinplatz

Ph.D. (Ottawa)
Clinical Psychologist
Contact Number:
 613-563-0846
Human Sexuality, sex therapy, sexual difficulties, eroticism and optimal sex.

Verner Knott

Ph.D. (London)
Using electroencephalography (EEG), brain event-related potentials (ERP), and computerized performance tasks to assess bio-behavioural markers of psychiatric disorders, the acute and chronic effects of drugs and psychotropic medications, and the early prediction of response outcome with pharmacotherapies.

Jennifer E. C. Lee

Ph.D. (Ottawa)
Dr. Lee’s research falls under the broad areas of population health data analysis and applications of occupational health psychology in the military context. Specifically, her research interests include topics such as psychological resilience, health risk perceptions and behaviours, and stress and coping.

Jeremy Mills

Ph.D. (Carleton)
Dr. Jeremy Mills is the Manager, Institutional Mental Health for the Ontario Region of the Correctional Service of Canada. He obtained his Ph.D. in Psychology from Carleton University in 2000. Dr. Mills has researched and published in the areas of risk assessment and communication, suicide assessment, and criminal attitudes and associates.

Kathryn Momtahan

Ph.D. (Carleton)
The Ottawa Hospital
Dr. Momtahan is a registered nurse with a PhD in Human Factors Psychology. In her current role, she mentors and supports approximately 4,700 nurses with regards to nursing research activities at The Ottawa Hospital, is the Executive Lead of the Nursing Research Work Group, and co-chairs the Nursing Informatics Strategic Planning Work Group.

Damian O’Keefe

Ph.D. (Guelph)

Dr O’Keefe is a Defence Scientist at the Director General Military Personnel Research and Analysis at the Department of National Defence. Dr O’Keefe’s current line of research includes Ethical Leadership, but he also has interest in the area of Occupational Personality and Integrity.

Andrew Pipe

M.D., LL.D. (Queen’s), D.Sc. (Brock), D.Sc. (Guelph)
Chief of the the Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. Main area of research is focused on new approaches to smoking cessation.

Laura Rees

Ph.D. C.Psych. (Carleton)
Clinical Neuropsychology and Rehabilitation. Interested in cognitive and behavioural outcomes following acquired brain injury and multiple sclerosis.

Jordan Schoenherr

Ph.D. (Carleton)

Learning and decision-making with applications in the monitoring and regulation of behaviour in individuals and social groups.

Michael Seto

Ph.D. (Queen)
Royal Ottawa Health Care Group

Research areas: Paraphilias, sexual offending, mentally disordered offenders

Tracey Skilling

Alla Skomorovsky

Ph.D. (Carleton)
Dr. Skomorovsky is a Defence Scientist at and a team leader of the Military Families’ Research team, Director General Military Personnel Research and Analysis, at the Department of National Defence, Canada. Dr. Skomorovsky conducts research in the area of occupational health psychology in the area of military families, focusing on both, child and adult health and well-being. Specifically, her research interests include topics such as psychological resilience, personality, work-life balance, mental health, stress and coping.

Giorgio Tasca

Ph.D. (Saskatchewan)
Research Chair in Psychotherapy Research and Director of Research at The Ottawa Hospital

I am a clinical psychologist at The Ottawa Hospital. I also hold a Research Chair in Psychotherapy Research. My areas of research include psychotherapy processes and outcomes, group psychotherapy, eating disorders, and attachment theory. Students are exposed to clinical research in a dynamic lab at The Ottawa Hospital that includes a multidisciplinary group of graduate and undergraduate students, clinical psychologists, research and medical staff.

Jennifer A. Veitch

Ph.D. (Victoria)
Environmental psychology, particularly the effects of lighting on mood, task performance, and well-being; the effects of individual control over environmental conditions on occupants and on energy consumption; promoting environmentally responsible behaviour, particularly at the organizational level.

Lisa Walker

Ph.D. (Windsor)
Cognition in multiple sclerosis (e.g. cognitive fatigue, cognitive reserve, change in cognition over time, assessment of cognition, information processing speed, functional neuroimaging of cognitive processes, cognition after hematopoietic stem cell transplant, etc.)

John R. Weekes

Ph.D. (Ohio)
Substance abuse research with offenders, treatment outcome research, offender motivation for treatment, harm reduction, clinical psychopathology, and forensic psychology.

Matthew M. Young

Ph.D. (Carleton)
Dr. Matthew Young is a Senior Research and Policy Analyst at the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) and an Adjunct Research Professor of Psychology at Carleton University. He is also lead researcher of CCSA’s monitoring and surveillance activities, which includes the Canadian Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (CCENDU) and the Student Drug Use Surveys working group (see the Cross Canada report on student alcohol and drug use for an example of the group’s activities). His research has employed community level indicators to identify new psychoactive substances (for example, see CCENDU “Bath Salts” Alert) or timely information on substance use trends (see CCENDU Opioid Bulletin) as well as survey data or hospital utilization data to assess the prevalence and harms associated with substance use. In addition, to drug use epidemiology, he is also interested in systematic reviews and rapid review methods and recently completed a systematic review assessing the effectiveness of brief interventions in reducing the non-medical use of psychoactive substances (see publications below).  Before joining CCSA, Dr. Young conducted research on problem gambling (PG) – specifically, developing and evaluating PG screening tools and assessment instruments as well as conducting PG epidemiological research.