Field Supervisors’ Hub – Videos

Thank you for visiting the Field Supervisors’ Resource Hub at the School of Social Work, Carleton University, and welcome to the Videos page. Here you will find a selection of educational videos on topics such as best practices in field education, having difficult conversations, and assisting students with reflective practice.

These materials do not belong to Carleton University’s School of Social Work, and we thank each author and creator for making these materials publicly available.

If you find that a link is broken, or you would like to share a resource to be included in the Hub, please contact ssw.practicum.admin@cunet.carleton.ca

Educating Effective Social Workers with Marion Bogo
SocialWork1914. (2019). Educating Effective Social Workers with Marion Bogo | YouTube Video.

Presentation Overview:

  • What are our educational goals
  • Simulation-based learning

Pre-practicum

  • In courses; linking theory, research, and practice
  • Enhancements: “Practice Fridays”
  • Assess students’ competence: OSCE

Bridging class and field

  • Provide baseline information for the field learning plan
  • Offering simulations concurrent with field

Best Practices in Field Education

Best Practices in Field Education: Presentation by Marion Bogo
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences. (2017).
Best Practices in Field Education: Presentation by Marion Bogo | Youtube Video.

This video is a presentation by Marion Bogo on best practices in social work field education.

Presentation Overview:

  • Towards holistic competence
  • Content: WHAT should students learn

Best practices

  • Process: HOW should I teach

Ted Talks: How to Train Employees to Have Difficult Conversations
Smith, T. M. (2018). How to Train Employees to Have Difficult Conversations | TED Talk Video.

Description:
Tamekia MizLadi Smith “shares a workplace training program called ‘I’m G.R.A.C.E.D.’ that will inspire bosses and employees alike to communicate with compassion and respect. Bottom line: always let people know why their work matters”. She elaborates on an example of asking clients or customers for personal data, and the importance of teaching employees how to respectfully ask for this information in a way that empowers both the employee and customer/client.

Trauma-Informed Social Work Supervision, Angela Willits, MSW, LCSW and Jennifer Ginsberg, MSSW, LCSW
UW-Madison School of Social Work (2016). Trauma-Informed Social Work Supervision, Angela Willits, MSW, LCSW and Jennifer Ginsberg, MSSW, LCSW | YouTube Video.

Presentation Overview:

  • What is supervision?
  • What is trauma-informed care?
Goal: Establish a shared understanding of functions of supervision and key principles of TIC.
  • How do we incorporate trauma-informed care into supervisory practice?
GoalIntroduce practical ideas for how to implement TIC into supervision; use practice examples to illustrate these ideas.
  • What are some challenges and barriers to incorporating trauma-informed practices into supervision?
Goal: Acknowledge individual and structural barriers that can impact incorporating TIC into supervision.

 

Community Care: Tools to help students with reflective practice and using theory
Hardy, R. (2018). Tools to help students with reflective practice and using theory. Visit the website.

Description:
This article and its videos cover simple tools that practice educators can use to support their students’ understanding and use of theory.

Supervisor Training – Models of Supervision

Adams State University (2017). Supervisor Training – Models of Supervision | YouTube Video.

Description:
“Joel Givens focuses on models of supervision, specifically aspects about the models that are useful during supervision at the site with students. Joel explores 3 different categories of supervision.”

The categories of supervision are:

  1. Psychotherapy-based models
  2. Developmental approaches
  3. Process models of supervision